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The Curbsiders Internal Medicine Podcast | MedEd | FOAMed | Internist | Hospitalist | Primary Care | Family Medicine

Supercharge your learning and enhance your practice with this Internal Medicine Podcast featuring board certified Internists as they interview national and international experts to bring you clinical pearls and practice changing knowledge. Doctors Matthew Watto, Stuart Brigham, and Paul Williams deliver some knowledge food for your brain hole. No boring lectures here, just high value content and a healthy dose of humor. Fantastic podcast for Internal Medicine, Family Medicine, Primary Care, and Hospital Medicine. Topics include heart disease, obesity, diabetes, cardiac imaging, migraines, fibromyalgia, hypertension, cholesterol, osteoporosis, insomnia, testosterone, functional medicine, dementia, and more!
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Now displaying: 2017

Supercharge your learning and enhance your practice with this Internal Medicine Podcast featuring board certified Internists as they interview national and international experts to bring you clinical pearls and practice changing knowledge. Doctors Matthew Watto, Stuart Brigham, and Paul Williams deliver some knowledge food for your brain hole.

thecurbsiders@gmail.com

Nov 20, 2017

Steady your hand and annihilate tremor with tips from Neurologist, and Movement Disorder specialist, Andres Deik, MD, Assistant Professor of Clinical Neurology at Kashlak Memorial Hospital (we can’t tell you where he really works: ) We teach you to differentiate benign causes of tremor from Parkinson’s disease with simple history and physical exam skills, plus nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic therapies for tremor. Special thanks to Beth Garbitelli and Chris Thrash who wrote and produced this episode and the show notes!

Full show notes available at http://thecurbsiders.com/podcast

Join our mailing list and receive a PDF copy of our show notes every Monday. Rate us on iTunes, recommend a guest or topic and give feedback at thecurbsiders@gmail.com.

Time Stamps

  • 00:00 Intro and disclaimer
  • 01:08 Listener feedback - Paul is not fired.
  • 02:09 Picks of the week.
  • 05:35 Dr. Deik intro
  • 07:19 Icebreaker questions
  • 12:20 Wikipedia definition
  • 13:02 Classifying tremor
  • 14:33 Postural tremor vs. reemerging rest tremor
  • 15:48 Important history questions
  • 17:58 Medications that can induce tremor
  • 21:39 Physical exam techniques
  • 27:30 Exam characteristics between typical PD tremor and ET
  • 28:36 History components to distinguish between PD and ET
  • 34:10 Misdiagnosis of Parkinson’s
  • 36:54 Imaging workup
  • 39:03 Case from Dr Deik
  • 41:33 Nonpharmacologic management
  • 44:18 Pharmacologic management
  • 49:06 Dosing propranolol
  • 51:07 Distinguishing between physiologic tremor and pathologic tremor’
  • 54:06 Website recommendations
  • 55:50 Handwriting
  • 59:14 Take home points
  • 61:34 Outro

Tags: tremor, essential, postural, neurology, Parkinsons, disease, beta, blockers, primidone, movement, disorders, antidepressants, occupational, therapy, rest, intention, assistant, care, education, doctor, family, foam, foamed, health, hospitalist, hospital, internal, internist, nurse, meded, medicine, medical, primary, physician, resident, student

Nov 13, 2017

Take control of chronic kidney disease with tools, and tips from @kidney_boy, Joel Topf, MD Salt Whisperer and Chief of Nephrology at Kashlak Memorial Hospital. Learn which equation is best for eGFR, how to counsel patients about progression/prognosis, how to monitor patients in CKD, and who needs a referral to Nephrology. Special thanks to Annie Medina, and Justin Berk for writing/producing this show and to physician-artist, Kate Grant for her lovely and hilarious artwork (more at paintscientific.com). 

Full show notes available at http://thecurbsiders.com/podcast

Join our mailing list and receive a PDF copy of our show notes every Monday. Rate us on iTunes, recommend a guest or topic and give feedback at thecurbsiders@gmail.com

Time Stamps

  • 00:00 Intro
  • 03:13 Pick of the weeks
  • 08:49 Clinical Case
  • 09:36 How to explain CKD to patients
  • 12:16 Loss of GFR with age
  • 13:22 Which equation should be used to estimate GFR
  • 18:05 Creatinine clearance from 24 hour urine collection
  • 22:25 Initial workup upon diagnosis of CKD
  • 25:40 Interpreting tests for proteinuria
  • 26:52 Staging and prognosis in CKD
  • 32:00 Completing the initial workup for CKD
  • 33:52 Who needs a referral to nephrology?
  • 35:53 What labs to check in CKD and a discussion of secondary hyperparathyroidism
  • 40:32 Take home points
  • 42:30 Outro

Tags: chronic, kidney, disease, nephrology, renal, glomerular, filtration, crcl, gfr, creatinine, prognosis, monitoring, iron, pth, proteinuria, hypertension, nephropathy, diabetes, albumin, protein, anemia, hyperparathyroidism, assistant, care, education, doctor, family, foam, foamed, health, hospitalist, hospital, internal, internist, nurse, meded, medicine, medical, primary, physician, resident, student

Nov 6, 2017

Hiding from Hep C? Dive in with experts Dr. Gina Simoncini, MD, MPH Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine at Temple University Hospital, & Dr. David Koren, PharmD, BCPS, AAHIVP,  board-certified pharmacotherapy specialist and infectious diseases clinical pharmacist at Temple University Hospital. They walk us through a simplified approach on whom to screen, how to start antiviral therapy, what to follow up on, and how to navigate insurance waters along the way. Special thanks to Sarah Roberts and Jordana Kozupsky who wrote and produced this episode and the show notes!

Full show notes available at http://thecurbsiders.com/podcast

Join our mailing list and receive a PDF copy of our show notes every Monday. Rate us on iTunes, recommend a guest or topic and give feedback at thecurbsiders@gmail.com.

Time Stamps

  • 00:00 Intro
  • 01:00 Guest bios
  • 03:00 Getting to know our guests
  • 05:35 Picks of the week
  • 10:05 Clinical case
  • 10:54 Diagnosing HCV
  • 12:00 ASCEND study
  • 13:14 Restrictions on HCV treatment
  • 15:17 Ordering and interpreting pre-treatment tests
  • 19:30 Prescribing medication
  • 22:00 Genotyping and drug resistance
  • 24:10 Patient counseling
  • 25:49 Understanding drug classes
  • 27:33 Drug interactions
  • 30:06 Multidisciplinary approach to treatment
  • 33:01 Follow-up
  • 36:47 Reinfection/cure rates
  • 39:35 Patient counseling revisited
  • 41:25 Side effects of treatment
  • 42:53 Screening
  • 44:02 Take home points

Tags: hepatitis, virus, hcv, direct-acting, antiviral, therapy, management, primary, care, liver, ultrasound, fibrosis, cirrhosis, side, effects, monitoring, hcc, hiv, infectious, disease, assistant, education, doctor, family, foam, foamed, health, hospitalist, hospital, internal, internist, nurse, meded, medicine, medical, primary, physician, resident, student

Oct 30, 2017

Fighting with Emergency Medicine colleagues is stupid. Learn how EM doctors think and avoid the petty infighting with tips from Dr. Scott Weingart, MD FCCM FUCEM DipHTFU, host of the EMCrit podcast, Clinical Associate Professor and Chief, Division of Emergency Critical Care at Stony Brook Hospital, NY. We discuss decision making, how to avoid anchoring bias, the devil of the gaps, why the elderly always get admitted, how to build relationships with the ED, and Scott’s pet peeves.

Full show notes available at http://thecurbsiders.com/podcast

Join our mailing list and receive a PDF copy of our show notes every Monday. Rate us on iTunes, recommend a guest or topic and give feedback at thecurbsiders@gmail.com.

Time Stamps

00:00 Intro

01:10 Picks of the week

05:28 Guest bio

07:00 Getting to know our guest

12:00 Do EM and IM docs hate each other?

14:04 Where conflicts arise.

17:05 System 1 versus system 2 thinking

20:19 When the patient doesn’t match the story

23:55 Why does every 85 year old get admitted?

26:05 Transitions of care: form ED to medical ward

32:08 Is face-to-face signoff only needed for sick patients?

36:28 The devil in the gaps

41:03 Scott’s beer recommendation

42:17 BP cutoff for discharge home

43:44 Scott’s biggest pet peeve with primary care

45:04 How to make friends and collaborate with your EM colleagues

47:14 Take home points

50:35 Outro

Tags: emergency, department, room, em, ed, im, conflict, devil, gaps, post-test, probability, illness, serious, system, one, bias, heuristic, assistant, care, education, doctor, family, foam, foamed, health, hospitalist, hospital, internal, internist, nurse, meded, medical, medicine, practitioner, professional, primary, physician, resident, student

Oct 27, 2017

Get schooled on medical homes, payer reform, and what the future might look like for primary care with Dr. Sue Bornstein, MD, FACP and Executive Director of the Texas Medical Home Initiative and Chair of the Health and Public Policy Committee at the ACP.

Dr Alex Lane of Cooper University Hospital joins Matt as cohost!

Full show notes available at http://thecurbsiders.com/podcast

Join our mailing list and receive a PDF copy of our show notes every Monday. Rate us on iTunes, recommend a guest or topic and give feedback at thecurbsiders@gmail.com.

Time Stamps

00:00 Intro

02:42 Guest CV and background

04:42 Getting to know our guest

10:40 Helpful resources for learning health policy

12:10 Who are the major players/influencers in health care and how do their interests align

15:02 Defining “medical home”

18:45 Where did the idea for a “medical home” originate

22:33 How does medical home affect cost

29:45 Payer reform and the quality payment program (QPP)

33:06 Recap and defining terms

37:18 How will the QPP be implemented?

41:04 Repeal and replace

43:37 Cuts in funding for safety net hospitals that care for the poorest, sickest patients

46:59 Take home points

48:55 Outro

Tags: medicare, medicaid, health, care, policy, spending, quality, improvement, advanced, payment, macra, mips, qpp, apm, medical, home, pcmh, affairs, super, utilizer, texas, physician, doctor, assistant, nurse, practitioner, foamed, meded

Oct 23, 2017

Expand your consciousness around medical cannabis (aka marijuana) with expert Dr Donald Abrams, Chief of the Hematology-Oncology Division at San Francisco General Hospital and a Professor of Clinical Medicine at the University of California San Francisco. We explain the cannabinoid system, THC, CBD aka cannabidiol, limitations surrounding cannabis research, current and future medical uses for medical cannabis (marijuana), and potential conditions it may benefit. We take a deep dive on the potential harms of medical cannabis and how to counsel patients on safe use. Plus, the return past guest and new correspondent, Dr Molly Heublein, Assistant Professor of Medicine from UCSF.

Thanks to Dr Molly Heublein for writing and producing this episode and it’s show notes!

Full show notes available at http://thecurbsiders.com/podcast

Join our mailing list and receive a PDF copy of our show notes every Monday. Rate us on iTunes, recommend a guest or topic and give feedback at thecurbsiders@gmail.com.

Clinical case from Kashlak Memorial:  MM is a 62 yo woman with a history of osteoarthritis and breast cancer, now on an aromatase inhibitor. She struggles with aching and stiffness in her hands, shoulders, knees, and hips. A friend suggested she try medical marijuana. She wants her provider’s opinion on if this is safe and effective.

Time Stamps

00:00 Intro

01:30 Picks of the week

03:40 Guest bio

05:11 Getting to know our guest

11:03 Clinical case

11:40 Limitations for cannabis research

12:59 Discussion of THC and cannabidiol

14:50 Smoking versus ingesting cannabis products

16:40 Recap of cannabinoid mechanism of action

18:30 Cannabis and cannabinoid products available

20:20 Synthetic THC (dronabinol)

21:46 How “recommending” cannabis and dispensaries work

25:46 Conditions that respond to medical cannabis

29:15 Potential harms of medical cannabis

34:51 Future directions of cannabinoid medicine research

37:24 Cannabis induced hyperemesis syndrome

39:00 Possible lung cancer risk

40:12 Take home points

42:54 The Curbsiders recap and share their views on the medical cannabis controversy

49:40 Outro

Tags: marijuana, medical, cannabis, weed, pot, oil, budtender, law, psychoactive, thc, cbd, cannabinoids, endocannabinoid, system, receptor, substance, harm, adverse, safety, pain, nausea, emesis

Oct 16, 2017

Remedy your ignorance as we review some basics of health care policy with Dr. Fatima Syed, Chair of the Council of Residents and Fellows for the American College of Physicians. Dr. Syed is early career physician whose work is already affecting health policy at a national level. You can do it too and we’ll teach you where to start along with defining basic, but poorly understood concepts like The Affordable Care Act, universal health care, single payer health care, MACRA, MIPS, and how “quality” is really measured. Don’t miss this part one in our health care policy for beginners series.

Full show notes available at http://thecurbsiders.com/podcast

Join our mailing list and receive a PDF copy of our show notes every Monday. Rate us on iTunes, recommend a guest or topic and give feedback at thecurbsiders@gmail.com

Time Stamps

00:00 Intro

03:20 Getting to know our guest

07:23 How to get involved in a professional organization

09:37 Resources to learn health policy

14:06 The Affordable Care Act and ObamaCare

17:56 What is MACRA, MIPS and how do they affect physicians?

23:09 Nationalized health care in the US versus other countries

25:33 Universal and “single payer” health care defined

27:00 How is quality health care defined? Why is the US rated so poorly?

32:53 Recap and summary of what we’ve learned

34:09 Dr. Syed’s take home points

35:36 Outro

Tags: policy, healthcare, macra, mips, aca, affordable, care, act, health, acp, advocacy, quality, payments, reimbursement, kaiser, commonwealth, assistant, care, education, doctor, family, foam, foamed, health, hospitalist, hospital, internal, internist, nurse, meded, medical, medicine, practitioner, professional, primary, physician, resident, student

Oct 9, 2017

Keep your cool in the face of inflammation, and make the path to vasculitis diagnosis less tortuous with Dr. Rebecca Sharim, Rheumatologist and Assistant Professor of Medicine at Temple University. In this episode, we go with the flow from large vessel to small vessel vasculitides, and then learn how to make the diagnosis and management of Giant Cell Arteritis (GCA) and polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR) less of a headache. Correspondent, Dr. Bryan Brown cohosts! 

Special thanks to Dr. Bryan Brown for writing our show notes, and creating figures for our handouts.

Full show notes available at http://thecurbsiders.com/podcast

Join our mailing list and receive a PDF copy of our show notes every Monday. Rate us on iTunes, recommend a guest or topic and give feedback at thecurbsiders@gmail.com.

Case from Kashlak Memorial:  A 75 year-old woman with a PMHx of hypertension presents to the ED with three days of worsening left sided headache, now with left sided vision loss during a Norwegian folk festival. On review of systems, she also endorses a week of soreness of her shoulders and hips. This has never happened to her before.

Time Stamps

00:00 Intro

03:07 Picks of the week

09:13 Getting to know our guest

15:00 Clinical case of vasculitis

15:59 Defining and classifying vasculitis

20:55 Workup for suspected vasculitis

23:17 How to explain GCA to a patient

25:08 Typical symptoms of vasculitis

28:00 Chewing gum test

29:34 Interpreting ESR

32:54 Basic exam and lab workup for vasculitis

35:23 Headache and suspicion for GCA/temporal arteritis

38:10 Is a temporal artery biopsy still mandatory?

39:20 Polymyalgia rheumatica

40:59 Steps to take when GCA/temporal arteritis suspected in clinic

43:55 PCP prophylaxis with high dose steroids

46:30 DMARDs and steroid sparing agents

48:12 Imaging studies to aid in diagnosis of GCA

50:50 Complications of long term steroid therapy

52:31 Take home points

53:26 Outro

Tags: giant, cell, arteritis, gca, vasculitis, steroids, temporal, biopsy, artery, esr, pmr, polymyalgia, rheumatica, vessel, headache, assistant, care, education, doctor, family, foam, foamed, health, hospitalist, hospital, internal, internist, nurse, meded, medical, medicine, practitioner, professional, primary, physician, resident, student

Oct 2, 2017

How to individualize learning for yourself, and your learners with tips from Dr. Philip A. Masters, editor-in-chief of MKSAP and IM Essentials, Vice President of Membership/International Programs at the American College of Physicians (ACP) and an Adjunct Professor of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. Dr. Masters schools us on work life balance, how to recognize and diagnose struggling learners, what resources to use, teaching exercises, and how to generate a study plan.

Full show notes available at http://thecurbsiders.com/podcast

Join our mailing list and receive a PDF copy of our show notes every Monday. Rate us on iTunes, recommend a guest or topic and give feedback at thecurbsiders@gmail.com.

Time Stamps

00:00 Intro

01:50 Listener feedback

04:18 Announcements

04:58 Picks of the Week

10:37 Guest bio and credentials

12:36 Getting to know our guest

18:05 Wellness and work life balance

22:55 How medical education has changed

28:55 Choosing resources as a learner

38:00 Case of a struggling learner

41:50 Learners with knowledge deficits and the role of the clinician (non-professional educator)

47:56 Resources to improve your skills as a medical educator

51:01 Take home points 

Tags: study, resources, MKSAP, acp, learner, educator, academic, assistant, care, education, doctor, family, foam, foamed, health, hospitalist, hospital, internal, internist, nurse, meded, medical, medicine, primary, physician, resident, student

 

Sep 25, 2017

Solidify your approach to back pain and sciatica with Dr. Chris Miles, Assistant Professor, Family & Community Medicine and Associate Director, Sports Medicine program, Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center. He schools us on red/yellow flags, physical exam maneuvers, when to order imaging, and practical tools and tips for evidence-based management! Correspondent Dr. Shreya Trivedi cohosts!

Full show notes available at http://thecurbsiders.com/podcast

Join our mailing list and receive a PDF copy of our show notes every Monday. Rate us on iTunes, recommend a guest or topic and give feedback at thecurbsiders@gmail.com.

Case from Kashlak Memorial: 53 yo M construction worker with a BMI of 29 and PMhx of DM2, HTN, depression presenting with right low back pain. He can't remember any trauma or injury. Denies radiation, no bowel or bladder dysfunction, saddle anesthesia, weakness

Case from Kashlak Memorial: 48 yo F nurse who has had intermittent back pain for years presented with acute flare after helping lift a patient. The pain similar to previous episodes but more severe and also radiates to her left foot. She has tried naproxen and exercises/mindful stress reduction for months without improvement. It is unbearable for her to work.

Time Stamps

00:00 Intro

02:14 Listener feedback

03:44 Announcements

05:14 Picks of the week

08:20 Millenial learners

10:40 Topic intro and guest bio

12:06 Getting to know our guest

17:30 Clinical case of back pain

20:18 How to hand sensory deficits

21:51 Red and yellow flag symptoms

25:44 How to approach patient with yellow flag symptoms

28:00 Physical exam for back pain

30:00 Special testing: Trendelenburg, Slump test, and Straight leg raise

35:48 Classifying types of back pain and a quick recap of teaching points so far

39:28 How to manage patient expectations

40:42 Treatment of non-radicular back pain

46:33 Home exercises and YouTube training

49:31 When to follow up after initial treatment trial

51:35 The patient with severe acute pain

53:33 Some pearls on muscle relaxants

55:22 Clinical case and how to treat radicular pain

59:40 Invasive treatment of back pain

65:04 Back pain treatments that don’t work

66:06 Take home points

67:34 Outro

Tags: back, pain, radicular, radiculopathy, sciatica, lumbar, disk, herniated, facet, arthritis, spine, muscle, relaxant, tramadol, nsaids, exam, assistant, care, education, doctor, family, foam, foamed, health, hospitalist, hospital, internal, internist, nurse, medicine, medical, primary, physician, resident, student

Sep 18, 2017

Summary:

Get a-HEAD of concussions (aka traumatic brain injuries) with tools, tips, and tricks from The Concussion Guy, Dr. Evan Ratner, Medical Director of Gridiron Heroes. Learn to recognize concussions/traumatic brain injury, what questions to ask, physical exam maneuvers, and how to counsel patients and families on safe return-to-learn/play.

Full show notes available at http://thecurbsiders.com/podcast

Join our mailing list and receive a PDF copy of our show notes every Monday. Rate us on iTunes, recommend a guest or topic and give feedback at thecurbsiders@gmail.com.

Case from Kashlak Memorial: 29F with no significant PMH presents to primary care office less than 24 hours after she accidentally struck her head on the metal of her car door. She experienced temporary altered consciousness lasting about one hour along with a headache. No nausea, vomiting, speech, or vision changes. She rested at home last night, but didn’t feel up to reading, or watching TV. She drove herself to your office today.

Time Stamps

00:00 Intro

02:33 Listener feedback

05:35 Picks of the week

12:15 Getting to know our guest

19:41 Defining and classifying concussion

23:00 What questions to ask your patient

26:34 Physical exam for patient with concussion

28:50 Use of neurocognitive testing in concussion

30:45 Specifics of testing eye movements and balance

35:00 Who needs imaging?

41:51 Recap of what we’ve learned so far

43:40 Can you let someone with a concussion go to sleep?

47:08 Return-to-learn protocol

50:30 Return-to-play protocol

52:30 Post-concussive syndrome

53:55 Medications for post-concussive symptoms

58:58 Second impact syndrome

64:40 Counseling the patient with multiple concussions

67:08 Take home points

69:09 The Curbsiders recap their favorite teaching points

71:30 Outro

Tags: concussion, post, concussive, syndrome, tbi, traumatic, brain, injury, return, play, school, cognitive, rest, treatment, diagnosis, assistant, care, education, doctor, family, foam, foamed, health, hospitalist, hospital, internal, internist, nurse, medicine, medical, primary, physician, resident, student

Sep 15, 2017

Improve your prescribing practices with tips from The Curbsiders as Matt, Stuart and Paul “Pwilliams” discuss safe prescribing in frail, older adults with diabetes, chronic kidney disease, hypertension, and/or dementia in this part two episode on polypharmacy and deprescribing.

Full show notes available at http://thecurbsiders.com/podcast

Join our mailing list and receive a PDF copy of our show notes every Monday. Rate us on iTunes, recommend a guest or topic and give feedback at thecurbsiders@gmail.com.

Tags: polypharmacy, deprescribing, prescribing, cascade, pharmacist, drug, therapy, medications, side, effects, adverse, reaction, beers, criteria, interaction, disease, anticholinergic, diabetes, hypertension, kidney, chronic, assistant, care, education, doctor, family, foam, foamed, health, hospitalist, hospital, internal, internist, nurse, medicine, medical, primary, physician, resident, student

Sep 11, 2017

Avoid common pitfalls, recognize prescribing cascades, and deprescribe like a champ with tips from Clinical Pharmacist, Dr. Sean M. Jeffery, Clinical Professor of Pharmacy at the University of Connecticut School of Pharmacy, and Chair of the Polypharmacy Special Interest Group for the American Geriatrics society. We discuss how to create better medication lists, tools and tips for deprescribing, how to counsel patients on polypharmacy, and safe use of medication in the elderly.

Special thanks to the American Geriatrics Society for setting up this interview.

Full show notes available at http://thecurbsiders.com/podcast

Join our mailing list and receive a PDF copy of our show notes every Monday. Rate us on iTunes, recommend a guest or topic and give feedback at thecurbsiders@gmail.com.

Time Stamps

00:00 Intro

01:12 Listener feedback

01:56 Picks of the week

06:28 Topic intro and guest bio

07:49 Getting to know our guest

13:05 Defining polypharmacy and related terms

16:30 Clinical Case of polypharmacy

20:34 Making better medication lists

25:01 Clinical Case from Kashlak Memorial

28:40 Beers Criteria

35:41 Statins in frail, elderly patients

38:00 Treating insomnia in the elderly

44:15 Dosing of meds in patients with CKD

45:50 Tool for analysis of drug-drug interactions

48:10 Take home points from Dr. Jeffery

50:00 Outro

Tags: polypharmacy, deprescribing, prescribing, cascade, pharmacist, drug, therapy, medications, side, effects, adverse, reaction, beers, criteria, interaction, disease, anticholinergic, assistant, care, education, doctor, family, foam, foamed, health, hospitalist, hospital, internal, internist, nurse, medicine, medical, primary, physician, resident, student

 

Sep 4, 2017

Enhance your skills in the identification and management of eating disorders with clinical pearls from Dr. Rosalind Kaplan, Clinical Associate Professor of Medicine at Thomas Jefferson University and a Primary Care Physician in Jefferson Women's Primary Care. We learn who to screen for eating disorders, what questions to ask, criteria for diagnosis, common complications, and how to manage them. This is a must listen if you’re like us and don’t know much about eating disorders specified and not otherwise specified.

Full show notes available at http://thecurbsiders.com/podcast

Join our mailing list and receive a PDF copy of our show notes every Monday. Rate us on iTunes, recommend a guest or topic and give feedback at thecurbsiders@gmail.com.

Case from Kashlak Memorial Hospital: 24yo F medical student with history of anxiety, weight loss, and restricting food senior year of high school. She regained weight with psychotherapy. Now she is a medical student who is over exercising, and abusing laxatives. She passes out one day after class and is referred to you at Kashlak.

Time Stamps:

00:00 Intro

01:19 Listener feedback

02:43 Picks of the week

06:50 Topic intro and guest bio

09:10 Getting to know our guest

15:18 Clinical case 

20:15 Broad overview of eating disorders

26:40 Eating disorder not otherwise specified

29:19 Underreporting and under diagnosis in men

30:25 Who to screen and how to do it

34:33 Questionnaires: SCOFF, ESP, and Binge Eating Disorder Inventory

38:42 Initial lab workup for eating disorders

42:38 Bone density screening, treatment

45:41 Back to the case: Initial patient counseling 

49:22 Medical therapy

52:20 Can we use bupropion?

54:02 What’s the role for primary care?

58:14 Hyponatremia in eating disorders

60:34 Complications of purging

66:25 How to be an ally for your patient

69:12 Treatment for binge eating

72:51 Take home points

74:30 Outro

Tags: anorexia, nervosa, bulimia, eating, disorder, weight, loss, binge, binging, purge, electrolytes, not, otherwise, specified, ideal, body, image, treatment, screening, assistant, care, education, doctor, family, foam, foamed, health, hospitalist, hospital, internal, internist, nurse, medicine, medical, primary, physician, resident, student

Aug 28, 2017

Don’t miss life threatening upper respiratory infections, and stop underusing antibiotics with tools and tips from our wonderful guests: Dr. Robert Centor, Professor of Medicine at University of Alabama, known for developing the Centor Criteria for pharyngitis, and his excellent blog and Twitter feed @medrants; and Dr. Alexandra Lane, Assistant Professor of Medicine, and Director of the Resident Clinic at Cooper University Hospital. We cover red flag signs in upper respiratory tract infections, diagnostic testing, physical exam maneuvers, antibiotic therapy, and symptom management. Plus, we’ll teach you have to counsel patients about upper respiratory infections and recommend some great learning resources.

Full show notes available at http://thecurbsiders.com/podcast

Join our mailing list and receive a PDF copy of our show notes every Monday. Rate us on iTunes, recommend a guest or topic and give feedback at thecurbsiders@gmail.com.

Case from Kashlak Memorial Hospital: 39 yo F with obesity, HTN, fibromyalgia who presents with 3 days of chills, subjective fevers, sinus pressure/congestion, post-nasal drip, and cough with some green/yellow mucus. She says, “I get this every year and it only goes away with antibiotics. They usually give me a z-pack”.

Tags: upper, respiratory, infections, cough, cold, nasal, pharyngitis, bronchitis, rhinosinusitis, sinusitis, decongestant, spray, symptoms, management, pneumonia, pertussis, influenza, antibiotics, overuse, assistant, care, education, doctor, family, foam, foamed, health, hospitalist, hospital, internal, internist, nurse, medicine, medical, primary, physician, resident, student

Aug 21, 2017

Get control of urinary incontinence with tips from Internist and Women’s Health Specialist, Dr. Molly Heublein, Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine at UCSF. This is a must listen if you’re still uncomfortable managing urinary incontinence. We learn nonpharmacologic strategies like pelvic floor muscle therapy, bladder training, timed voiding, foods to avoid, and run through the available medical therapies, their efficacy and side effects. Plus, a brief review of next line therapies like percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation, and botox injections for overactive bladder.

Full show notes available at http://thecurbsiders.com/podcast

Join our mailing list and receive a PDF copy of our show notes every Monday. Rate us on iTunes, recommend a guest or topic and give feedback at thecurbsiders@gmail.com.

Case: 79 yo F with at least 10 years of urinary urgency with occasional loss of small amounts of urine and rare full bladder emptying. She drinks 1 cup of coffee every morning and about 2-3 glasses of water per day. She tries to minimize liquids due to her incontinence. She has HTN and takes HCTZ. Has been on oxybutynin for 10 years and wants to try something else.

Time Stamps

00:00 Intro

01:06 Listener feedback

02:43 Announcements

03:43 Picks of the week

09:07 Getting to know our guest

14:27 Case of urinary incontinence (UI)

15:30 Epidemiology of UI

16:34 Screening for UI

17:30 The 3IQ Questionnaire

18:44 Additional testing in UI

21:23 Classifying UI

24:00 Nonpharmacologic therapy for UI

32:42 Effectiveness of pharmacologic versus nonpharmacologic therapy

34:50 Case continued. Changing medications

37:42 Mirabegron as an alternative to anticholinergics

40:18 More options for stress UI management

41:40 Next line therapies for urge UI, overactive bladder

44:38 Surgery for stress urinary incontinence

45:50 Botox therapy for urge UI, overactive bladder

48:30 Do we need any more fancy diagnostic tests?

50:30 Take home points

55:05 Stuart schools us on urinary incontinence in men and timing of BPH meds

56:40 Outro

Tags: urinary, urine, incontinence, urge, stress, mixed, bladder, training, kegels, pelvic, floor, muscle, therapy, anticholinergic, botox, assistant, care, education, doctor, family, foam, foamed, health, hospitalist, hospital, internal, internist, nurse, medicine, medical, primary, physician, resident, student

Aug 14, 2017

Master the anemia algorithm, and take a deep dive on iron deficiency, anemia of chronic kidney disease, anemia of chronic inflammation, causes of macrocytic anemia and more in this discussion with international expert, Dr. David P. Steensma, Senior Physician from Dana Farber Institute, and Associate Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School.

Full show notes available at http://thecurbsiders.com/podcast

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Cases from Kashlak Memorial:

  • 62 yo M with diabetes and CKD with asymptomatic Hgb 10, MCV 90, and Cr. 1.9?
  • 72 yo F with HTN with asymptomatic Hgb of 11, MCV 85 and Cr. 0.6.
  • 72 yo F with breast cancer in remission after lumpectomy, adjuvant chemo, and XRT treated 6 years ago presents with fatigue and some dyspnea on exertion. Hgb 9.6, MCV 102.

Time Stamps

00:00 Intro

01:18 Listener feedback

04:05 Announcement: We’re looking for on air correspondents to join The Curbsiders

05:05 Picks of the week

11:12 Getting to know our guest

17:50 Case #1 Normocytic anemia

19:15 Defining anemia (WHO criteria)

21:10 Epidemiology of anemia

23:45 Normocytic anemia

25:55 Erythropoietin for diagnosis and treatment

28:22 Anemia of CKD or chronic inflammation?

31:37 Discussion of ferritin and soluble transferrin receptor

33:47 Case #1 Conclusion

35:45 Hemoglobin targets in CKD

36:53 Case #2 Microcytic anemia

37:43 Correct reticulocyte count and reticulocyte index

40:45 Deciding on dose and route for iron repletion

43:44 Does vitamin C improve iron absorption?

45:27 Case #3 Macrocytic anemia

46:54 Vitamin B12 deficiency

51:54 Medication related B12 deficiency

52:35 Myelodysplastic syndrome

55:00 Side effects of common MDS treatments

56:18 Take home points

57:35 The Curbsiders post game analysis

64:16 Outro

Tags: anemia, hemoglobin, iron, supplementation, B12, vitamin, ferritin, kidney, chronic, inflammation, deficiency, oral, therapy, myelodysplastic, syndrome, assistant, care, education, doctor, family, foam, foamed, health, hospitalist, hospital, internal, internist, nurse, medicine, medical, primary, physician, resident, student

Aug 7, 2017

Get cozy with these new drugs for diabetes. Don’t be scared, they won’t bite. On this episode,  we interview Endocrinologist and current president of AACE, Dr. Jonathan D. Leffert, MD, FACP, FACE, ECNU about how to utilize the myriad of new diabetes drugs on the marketplace including SGLT2 inhibitors, DPP4 inhibitors, GLP1 agonists, and new ultra long acting insulins. Plus, we’ll teach you how to choose between agents, common side effects, A1C goals, and the cardiovascular benefits of these newer agents.

Full show notes available at http://thecurbsiders.com/podcast

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Case: Case from Kashlak Memorial Hospital: 49 yo M with HTN, BMI 29, hyperlipidemia, family history of premature CAD (dad age 45yo), and DM2 with A1C increase from 6.4% to 9% while on metformin monotherapy.

Time Stamps

00:00 Intro

04:33 Getting to know our guest

09:50 Clinical case of diabetes

12:40 Latent autoimmune diabetes

15:16 Life expectancy and A1C goal

16:47 Anemia’s effect on A1C

18:40 Back to our case, choice of agent

20:57 Lifestyle changes effect on A1C

22:55 Starting an SGLT2 inhibitor, what to look for

26:45 SGLT2 inhibitor use in patient already on diuretic

27:53 Discussion of CV risk reduction and newer DM meds

33:27 Euglycemic DKA

34:30 Choice of agent GLP1 vs SGLT2

37:10 Use of DPP4 inhibitors

38:55 Back to the case

39:37 Degludec, long acting insulin

41:34 Clinical case conclusion

43:03 Take home points

45:15 Outro

Tags: diabetes, medications, glucose, insulin, oral, therapy, drug, hypoglycemia, a1c, blood, cardiac, risk, assistant, care, education, doctor, family, foam, foamed, health, hospitalist, hospital, internal, internist, nurse, medicine, medical, primary, physician, resident, student

Jul 31, 2017

Master this practical approach to reading the medical literature (*No statistics needed!) with expert tips from Dr. Christine Laine, Editor in Chief, Annals of Internal Medicine, and Dr. Darren Taichman, Executive Deputy Editor, Annals of Internal Medicine. They teach us what we should be reading, and detail their thought processes as they appraise an article. Topics covered include: Is 3 minute critical appraisal possible? What’s the deal with P-values? What are common sources of bias? How does the approach differ with clinical trials versus observational studies versus meta-analyses?

*Minimal statistics needed ; )

Full show notes available at http://thecurbsiders.com/podcast

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Time Stamps

00:00 Intro

01:13 Listener comment on Entresto

02:50 Picks of the week

09:36 Getting to know our guests

14:00 How to stay up on the medical literature

17:15 Three minute critical appraisal

19:15 Step 1: Assess the outcome being studied

20:50 Statistical versus clinical significance

22:33 Evaluating composite endpoints

24:47 Statistical power

28:58 Evaluating for bias

34:40 Recap of what we’ve learned so far

36:33 Is PICO useful?

39:01 Observational studies and bias

41:09 Evaluating a meta-analysis

46:05 Take home points

50:35 The Curbsiders recap the episode

53:02 Outro

Tags: literature, appraisal, meta, analysis, analyze, critical, read, medical, journal, study, randomized, observational, systematic, review, clinical, trial, assistant, care, education, doctor, family, foam, foamed, health, hospitalist, hospital, internal, internist, nurse, medicine, medical, primary, physician, resident, student

Jul 24, 2017

A simplified approach to dizziness/vertigo with tips from international expert, Dr. David Newman-Toker, Professor of Neurology, Ophthalmology and Otolaryngology at Johns Hopkins University. We learn how to differentiate stroke from other causes of dizziness/vertigo; how to approach the differential diagnosis in dizziness/vertigo; how to perform the Dix-Hallpike test, Epley maneuver, and HINTS exam; plus, who benefits from medical therapy and vestibular rehab.

Special thanks to Dr. Cyrus Askin who found our expert, wrote the questions for this episode, and acted as our cohost.

Full show notes available at http://thecurbsiders.com/podcast

Join our newsletter mailing list. Rate us on iTunes, recommend a guest or topic and give feedback at thecurbsiders@gmail.com.

Case: A 45-year-old man presents to the emergency department because of continuous dizziness, nausea, vomiting and unsteady gait that began 18 hours earlier.

Time Stamps

00:00 Intro

04:16 Getting to know our guest

11:56 Clinical Case

13:13 Why can’t patients describe their dizziness?

15:20 Classifying dizziness

18:35 The 3 vestibular syndrome buckets defined

22:14 Episodic vestibular syndrome differential diagnosis

26:49 Acute vestibular syndrome differential diagnosis

28:08 Chronic vestibular syndrome differential diagnosis

30:15 Challenges of medical history taking

32:10 Approach to the acute vestibular syndrome/HINTS

33:38 How to evaluate nystagmus

38:00 How to perform the head impulse test (aka head thrust)

45:56 How to perform “test of skew” (alternate cover testing)

47:45 Recap of HINTS exam and discussion of MRI

50:50 Signs and symptoms of cerebellar stroke

55:17 Use of Dix-Hallpike for episodic vertigo

57:00 How to perform Dix-Hallpike

59:50 How to perform the Epley maneuver

64:17 What happens when you choose the wrong test

66:10 Continuous versus triggered dizziness, or vertigo

67:40 Meclizine use in BPPV

69:25 How to cure horizontal canal BPPV

71:00 Treatment for vestibular neuritis

72:56 Treatment for Meniere’s disease

74:32 Who benefits from vestibular rehab/exercises

77:23 Dizziness and giddiness

78:15 Take home points

81:06 Outro

Tags: vertigo, dizziness, presyncope, ataxia, stroke, BPPV, Meniere’s, disease, neuritis, vestibular, syndrome, episodic, meclizine, migraine, gait, assistant, care, education, doctor, family, foam, foamed, health, hospitalist, hospital, internal, internist, nurse, medicine, medical, primary, physician, resident, student

Jul 17, 2017

Step up your salt game. We deconstruct hyponatremia with expert tips from our Chief of Nephrology, Dr. Joel Topf aka @kidney_boy aka The Salt Whisperer. Topics include: true versus false hyponatremia, SIADH, tea and toast/beer potomania, safe rates of sodium correction, fluid restriction, salt tablets, IV fluid choice, DDAVP clamps, and more.

Full show notes available at http://thecurbsiders.com/podcast

Join our newsletter mailing list. Rate us on iTunes, recommend a guest or topic and give feedback at thecurbsiders@gmail.com.

Case: 85yo F with anxiety, asthma, HTN (on a CCB), hypothyroidism with TSH of 3 on therapy. Sodium was 128 from previous values 134-137 mg/dL. She is more fatigued than usual.

Time Stamps

00:00 Intro

03:00 Guest interview

06:45 Pick of the week w/Dr. Topf

15:50 Clinical case of hyponatremia

17:18 False hyponatremia normal osmolality

19:04 False hyponatremia high osmolality

20:06 Understanding why osmolality matters

22:58 Workup false hyponatremia

24:15 Recap of discussion so far

25:10 ADH dependent vs independent hyponatremia

26:30 Psychogenic polydipsia

28:45 Renal failure and hyponatremia

29:33 Tea and toast, and Beer Drinker’s potomania

34:42 ADH dependent hyponatremia

37:45 Volume versus osmolality

39:30 Volume status exam

44:44 Additional testing with urine lytes and uric acid

47:00 Treatment for SIADH

52:12 Discussion of the vaptans

57:51 Additional testing in SIADH

62:20 When to admit patient for hyponatremia

63:29 Clinical case of hyponatremia complications

68:26 Fluids and rate of correction

73:06 DDAVP clamp

76:00 Moderate hyponatremia

78:05 Diuretic dosing DOES matter!

81:29 Loop diuretics for SIADH

83:55 Take home points

86:55 Outro

Tags: hyponatremia, salt, sodium, SIADH, ADH, vasopressin, fluids, electrolytes, kidney, nephrology, osmolality, urine, concentration, assistant, care, education, doctor, family, foam, foamed, health, hospitalist, hospital, internal, internist, nurse, medicine, medical, primary, physician, resident, student

Jul 10, 2017

Solidify your knowledge of osteoporosis and osteopenia in this discussion with Endocrinologists and osteoporosis guideline authors, Dr. Rachel Pessah-Pollack, and Dr. Dan Hurley from the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE). Learn when to start therapy after an acute hip fracture, how to use bone turnover markers to assess fracture risk, more on how to dose calcium and vitamin D, and finally, we discuss the new American College of Physicians (ACP) guidelines and how they differ from the AACE guidelines on osteoporosis.

For a more basic talk on osteoporosis check out episode #18 w/Dr. Pauline Camacho.

Full show notes available at http://thecurbsiders.com/podcast

Join our newsletter mailing list. Rate us on iTunes, recommend a guest or topic and give feedback at thecurbsiders@gmail.com.

Time Stamps

00:00 Intro

03:00 Picks of the week

07:31 Guest and topic intro

10:25 Rapid fire questions

14:45 Clinical Case and defining osteoporosis

17:00 FRAX score

20:35 Secondary evaluation for cause of bone loss

20:54 Bone turnover markers (telopeptides)

23:17 Alkaline phosphatase

26:30 Calcium and Vit D

29:35 Recap of teaching points so far

31:25 Antiresorptive versus anabolic therapy

32:40 Aromatase inhibitors increase fracture risk

34:28 When to start therapy after fracture

35:44 Mechanism of action recombinant PTH

41:38 Vitamin D assay and dosing

46:53 Calcium intake, and formulations

49:45 Take home points

50:54 Recap and discussion of AACE vs ACP guidelines by The Curbsiders

59:42 Outro

Tags: bone, osteoporosis, anabolic, osteopenia, vitamin D, calcium, fracture, density, AACE, guidelines, assistant, care, education, doctor, family, foam, foamed, health, hospitalist, hospital, internal, internist, nurse, medicine, medical, primary, physician, resident, student

Jul 3, 2017

Master the evaluation of acute and chronic chest pain with coronary CT angiography (CCTA). We deconstruct this game changing technology w/experts from the Society for Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT), Dr. Todd Villines and Dr. Ahmad Slim. We’ve got answers on what to do when a patient with chest pain has a prior CAC score of zero, and/or a CCTA with non-obstructive disease. Plus: how to select, prepare, and counsel patients; how to interpret reports; choosing between myocardial perfusion study and CCTA, and more!

Special thanks to Dr. Emilio Fentanes from SCCT for setting up this interview.

Full show notes available at http://thecurbsiders.com/podcast

Join our newsletter mailing list. Rate us on iTunes, recommend a guest or topic and give feedback at thecurbsiders@gmail.com.

Case: 45 yo F active duty Colonel with chronic chest pain syndrome despite negative conventional stress test and CAC score of zero.

Time Stamps

00:00 Intro

04:00 Rapid fire questions

08:23 Book recommendations

10:14 Defining terms CCTA vs CAC

12:47 Script for counseling patient about CCTA

14:34 Prep for CCTA

16:40 Why is CCTA controversial?

19:37 Patient selection for CCTA both acute and chronic

25:20 Chronic chest pain and CCTA

27:58 CAC and CCTA in high risk occupations

33:25 Clinical case

36:10 Acute chest pain in patient w/CAC score zero

39:18 Acute chest pain in patient w/CAC score zero and previous CCTA w/non-obstructive CAD

41:22 How to read a CCTA report

45:48 CCTA versus conventional testing and risk MI, death

49:18 Use of CCTA in outpatients

52:16 Plaque characteristics and risk ACS

55:51 CCTA w/non-obstructive disease in patients with acute chest pain

58:14 When is myocardial perfusion scanning better?

61:00 Listener question on small vessel disease

62:09 Take home points

65:00 Curbsiders recap

69:33 Outro

Jun 26, 2017

Update your management of heart failure (HF) with expert tips from Cardiologist Dr. Eric Adler, Associate Professor of Medicine and Director of Cardiac Transplant and Mechanical Circulatory Support at UC San Diego. We cover how to use BNP, a simple way to examine jugular venous distention, medical therapy for heart failure, the PARADIGM-HF trial, and how to use sacubitril/valsartan (Entresto).

Full show notes available at http://thecurbsiders.com/podcast

Join our newsletter mailing list. Rate us on iTunes, recommend a guest or topic and give feedback at thecurbsiders@gmail.com.

Time Stamps

00:00 Intro

04:25 Rapid fire questions

06:00 Palliative care and heart failure

08:40 Book recommendation

10:20 Advice for teachers and learners

12:27 Clinical case of HF

13:38 Classification and staging of HF

17:07 Discussion of BNP

19:35 How to perform neck vein exam for JVD

21:20 BNP for prognosis

23:00 BNP at hospital discharge

26:36 Factors that affect BNP

27:25 Initial patient counseling

32:35 Exercise in HF

34:00 Additional testing at time of diagnosis

36:28 Initial medical therapy

38:30 Discussion of diuretics and dosing

42:50 Aldosterone antagonists

44:30 PARADIGM-HF and entresto

51:27 Medications to avoid in HF

54:14 Digoxin

57:30 Dr. Adler’s take home points

59:11 Stuart questions dosing conventions

60:48 Outro

Tags: arni, assistant, care, diuretics, doctor, education, failure, family, foam, foamed, health, heart, hospitalist, hospital, internal, internist, neprilysin, nurse, management, medicine, medical, physician, practitioner, primary, resident, sacubitril, student

Jun 19, 2017

Master the safe and effective use of obesity medications with Endocrinologist, Dr. Karl Nadolsky (co-author of 2016 AACE Obesity guidelines), Director of the Diabetes, Obesity & Metabolic Institute at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center. We get under the hood of each FDA approved obesity medication plus some of our normal hijinks. Check out episode #23 for a more general overview of obesity.

Full show notes available at http://thecurbsiders.com/podcast

Join our newsletter mailing list. Rate us on iTunes, recommend a guest or topic and give feedback at thecurbsiders@gmail.com.

Time Stamps

00:00 Intro

03:12 Picks of the week

08:44 Rapid fire questions

13:00 Counsel patients about obesity

14:40 Pathophysiology of obesity

18:00 Case

22:46 Phentermine/topiramate (Qsymia)

26:20 Bupropion/naltrexone (Contrave)

29:18 Liraglutide (Saxenda)

34:32 Orlistat (Alli, Xenical)

37:35 Cost issues

40:18 Lifelong medical therapy for obesity

42:44 Dr. Nadolsky’s take home points

44:45 The Curbsiders recap and discuss their experience with obesity medications

52:28 Outro

Tags: assistant, care, doctor, education family, foam, foamed, health, hospitalist, hospital, internal, internist, nurse, medicine, medical, physician, practitioner, primary, resident, student, obesity, pharmacotherapy, weight loss, safety, side effects, orlistat, alli, naltrexone, bupropion, contrave, phentermine, topiramate, qsymia, lorcaserin, belviq, FDA

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